The Boating Channel Between Upper Eau Claire and Birch Lakes, Barnes, WI

The Boating Channel Between Upper Eau Claire and Birch Lakes 

Here’s another in an occasional series of posts answering the question: “Can I really get there from here?”

Here in Northwest Wisconsin, maps often show a connection between two lakes, and fising guidebooks may mention a “navigable channel.” But can you really get there from here? The answer, of course, is “it depends.” First, it depends on the size of your boat. How much water does it draw, how wide is it, and how tall is it? If your boat has an awning or visor, can it be folded down? In some cases, the weather and the time of year can even make a difference. If the water is too low, there won’t be enough to float your boat. Too high, and you may not have quite enough headroom under a bridge. So your mileage, as they say, may vary. Keep your speed down, and proceed with caution.

So… Just how navigable is the channel between Upper Eau Claire Lake, Birch Lake, and Robinson Lake? Here’s the answer, complete with a video showing what you can expect. At normal water levels the channels between these three lakes are easily navigable by canoe, kayak, fishing boat, runabout, or pontoon—almost any boat you’re likely to see out on these lakes. Both channels—the one between Upper Eau Claire Lake and Birch Lake, and the one between Birch Lake and Robinson Lake—are deep enough so you’ll see signs reminding you they’re no-wake zones. But that’s OK. You’ll want to take your time and enjoy the scenery anyway.

One note of caution: Some parts of Birch Lake are fairly shallow. If you’re on the way through, keep your speed down and swing wide around both islands.

And by the way… If you’d like to see a beautiful cabin on Birch Lake, please visit  – Birch Lake cabin for sale  Jean Hedren, Edina Realty. 218-590-6634

The Route Between Upper Eau Claire Lake, Birch Lake, and Robinson Lake, Barnes, WI

The Route Between Upper Eau Claire Lake, Birch Lake, and Robinson Lake

Here’s another in an occasional series of posts answering the question: “Can I really get there from here?”

Here in Northwest Wisconsin, maps often show a connection between two lakes, and fising guidebooks may mention a “navigable channel.” But can you really get there from here? The answer, of course, is “it depends.” First, it depends on the size of your boat. How much water does it draw, how wide is it, and how tall is it? If your boat has an awning or visor, can it be folded down? In some cases, the weather and the time of year can even make a difference. If the water is too low, there won’t be enough to float your boat. Too high, and you may not have quite enough headroom under a bridge. So your mileage, as they say, may vary. Keep your speed down, and proceed with caution.

The channels from Upper Eau Claire to Birch Lake and Robinson Lake

The channels from Upper Eau Claire to Birch Lake and Robinson Lake

(I began this series with the connection between 200-acre Bony Lake and 902-acre Middle Eau Claire Lake. A second post described the channel between Middle Eau Claire Lake and Lower Eau Claire Lake; at the moment, I also have homes available on both Middle and Lower. A third post described the channel between Bond Lake and Leader Lake, a pair of lakes in southern Douglas County.

So… Just how navigable is the channel between Upper Eau Claire Lake, Birch Lake, and Robinson Lake? Here’s the answer, complete with a few photos showing what you can expect. At normal water levels the channels between these three lakes are easily navigable by canoe, kayak, fishing boat, runabout, or pontoon—almost any boat you’re likely to see out on these lakes. Both channels—the one between Upper Eau Claire Lake and Birch Lake, and the one between Birch Lake and Robinson Lake—are deep enough so you’ll see signs reminding you they’re no-wake zones. But that’s OK. You’ll want to take your time and enjoy the scenery anyway.

One note of caution: Some parts of Birch Lake are fairly shallow. If you’re on the way through, keep your speed down and swing wide around both islands.

And by the way… If you’d like to see a home on any of these lakes, please visit  my website – www.JeanHedren.com  Jean Hedren, Edina Realty. 218-590-6634

The Obligatory Sandy Lake Bottom Photo

The Obligatory Sandy Lake Bottom Photo

As someone who sells a lot of waterfront properties here in Northwest Wisconsin, I’ve noticed that buyers shopping for a lake home or cabin will often have one very specific request. They want level, sandy frontage—or at least a sandy bottom that’s good for swimming.

Now, there’s nothing wrong with a gravel bottom, or even a muck bottom. That sort of shoreline might be better for fishing, and it’s also more inviting for waterfowl and other wildlife. Still, it’s not surprising that I get a lot of requests for up-north lake homes and cabins with a sandy, gently sloping waterfront. This year I’ve already sold several of these lakeshore properties. Fortunately, I have more available right now.

Because lake homes and cabins with a sandy shoreline are especially sought-after, these listings almost always include a photo showing the actual sand bottom. (Other Realtors do this, too; I’m pretty sure I’m not giving away any trade secrets here.) No matter how beautiful the home itself, no matter how magnificent the view, and no matter how photogenic the custom cabinetry, granite countertops, and stone fireplace, I still try and squeeze in “The Obligatory Sandy Bottom Shot.”

Although you should probably consider other criteria, too, sometimes it’s nice to see photographic evidence that a particular lake home or cabin really does have a shoreline with a sandy bottom. So here, for your viewing enjoyment, is a splendid collection of sandy bottom shots.

A few of these lake homes and cabins are already sold—including the delightful 2 BR chalet on Leader Lake that’s only steps away from the sand shoreline at the top of this post. But if you’d like to learn more about my “sandy bottom” lake homes and cabins that are still available, visit my Edina Realty website. If you like what you see, give me a call.

(And if you’d prefer a rock and gravel bottom for better front-yard walleye fishing, or a sand and muck bottom for more bluegills, bass, and water lilies, give me a call. I can definitely help you find a lake home or cabin with that sort of shoreline, too.)

Birch Lake

Birch Lake

Birch Lake, Barnes, WI. 2 BR, 2 BA.

Lower Eau Claire Lake

Lower Eau Claire Lake

Lower Eau Claire Lake. 3 BR, 2 BA. Just sold.

Minong Flowage

Minong Flowage

Minong Flowage, Wascott, WI. 4 BR, 2 BA.

Twin Lake

Twin Lake

 Lower Twin Lake, Minong, WI. 3 BR, 3 BA. Just sold.

Lake Nebagamon

Lake Nebagamon

Lake Nebagamon, WI. 3 BR, 2 BA.

Cranberry Lake

Cranberry Lake

Cranberry Lake, Wascott, WI. 3 BR, 3 BA. Pending.

Lake St Croix

Lake St Croix

Upper Saint Croix Lake, Solon Springs, WI. 3 BR, 2 BA. Just sold.

 

The Mysterious Whitefish of Whitefish Lake, Douglas County, WI

The Mysterious Whitefish of Whitefish Lake, Douglas County, WI

Whitefish Lake, Douglas County, WI

Whitefish Lake, Douglas County, WI

I’ve often wondered… Are there really whitefish in Whitefish lake? I’ve never heard of anyone catching one. So what’s the story? Are they still there? If so, where are they?

To find out, I started with a little research online. Then I talked with Scott Toshner, the WI DNR fisheries biologist for Douglas and Bayfield Counties. Here’s what I learned.

Whitefish Lake (also shown on some maps as Bardon Lake) doesn’t have whitefish, but it may have at one time. It does, however, have plenty of cisco, which are a close relative. Both species belong the genus Coregonus. They’re often confused; here’s a good explanation of the difference between whitefish and cisco. To add to the confusion, cisco are also known as tullibee or lake herring—and lake herring aren’t the same as marine herring found in the ocean.

Whitefish can grow to over 12 pounds, and cisco to over 5 pounds. Both are fished commercially in Lake Superior, and both are delicious. Inland, they’re only found in a small number of northwestern Wisconsin’s especially deep, cold lakes. Among them are the Whitefish lake in southern Douglas County (that’s the one we’re talking about here), another Whitefish Lake over in Sawyer County, and Bayfield County’s Cisco Lake and Lake Owen. In Douglas County’s Whitefish Lake, cisco are only found in the southern part of the lake, which reaches a depth of 102’. There don’t seem to be any in the northern half of the lake, which has a maximum depth of “only” 56’.

Cisco can’t tolerate warm water, and biologists believe they may be a “canary in the coal mine” sort of indicator species when it comes to climate change and water quality. They spend most of their time in deep water. And although they sometimes eat minnows or aquatic insects, they mostly eat plankton. So although commercial fishermen can catch plenty of them in nets, they’re rarely caught by hook-and-line. On Whitefish Lake, most anglers are happy to settle for northern pike, walleye, largemouth bass, smallmouth bass, trout, and panfish.

Still, it’s great just knowing they’re present. If you’re fortunate enough to live on an inland lake in northern Wisconsin that contains whitefish or cisco, you know you’re on a deep, cold clearwater lake. Here in southern Douglas County, Whitefish Lake is a great example.

And by the way… I currently have a gorgeous home for sale on Whitefish Lake – this stunning 6-bedroom home at the very head of the lake. Please contact me if you’d like to see this very special lake home. I’m also listing two great lake homes on nearby Bass Lake and Leader Lake. You can click www.JeanHedren.com to see all my listings.

Cisco of Whitefish Lake

Cisco of Whitefish Lake