Search homes and cabins for sale in Eau Claire Chain of Lakes, Barnes, WI.

Homes and cabins for sale in Eau Claire Chain of Lakes, Barnes, WI.

You’ll find a variety of lake, town, and country homes available in Barnes and Gordon Wisconsin in all price ranges.

Start your search here: Homes for sale in Eau Claire Chain of Lakes, Barnes, Wisconsin

More about the Eau Claire Chain of Lakes.

Thinking of buying or selling real estate in NW Wisconsin? Call Jean Hedren, Edina Realty NW Wisconsin, 218-590-6634. Email: jeanhedren@edinarealty.com.

Nancy Lake fishing headquarters sold by Jean Hedren NW Wisconsin Realtor. N12741 Three Mile Rd, Minong, WI

This sunny, spacious Nancy Lake home is the perfect up north fishing headquarters. 3 bedrooms, 1.5 bath, 1278 sq ft with 150′ of level lake frontage on this popular, full recreation lake.

Buying or selling real estate in Minong WI or other NW Wisconsin community? Call Jean Hedren, Your Edina Realty NW Wisconsin Realtor, at 218-590-6634. Or, email Jean: jeanhedren@edinarealty.com

Subscribe to my NW Wisconsin Realtor YouTube video channel

In my NW Wisconsin Realtor YouTube video channel, you’ll find a large selection  of property videos throughout the NW Wisconsin area.    

You’ll see real estate videos of lake homes, cabins, and country homes located in:  Gordon, Barnes, Minong, Solon Springs, Lake Nebagamon, Trego, and other communities.

You’ll also see videos of dozens of the area lakes, plus tours of how some lakes are connected by boating channels. Eau Claire Chain of Lakes, Minong Flowage/Cranberry Lake, Leader and Bond Lakes, and many others. It’s a great way to see the beauty of the NW Wisconsin lakes. Then, when you come for a visit you may decide to stay for a lifetime.

Interested in buying or selling in NW Wisconsin? Call Jean Hedren, Your Edina Realty NW Wisconsin Realtor, at 218-590-6634. Or, email Jean at jeanhedren@edinarealty.com

What the heck’s a “flowage,” and why is it called that??

Minong Flowage

All over northern Wisconsin, the term flowage has worked its way into dozens of lake names. Here in northwestern Wisconsin, we have the Minong Flowage, Gordon Flowage, Chippewa Flowage, and Tigercat Flowage—and that’s just for starters. And despite the number of flowages in northern Wisconsin, people who live on any one of them can often be heard calling their home lake simply “The Flowage.”

So what exactly is a flowage, and how did they come to be called that?

A flowage is simply a lake that’s formed upstream of a dam; it’s a regionalism that’s rarely heard outside of Wisconsin. In other parts of the country, especially in the South and the West, a flowage might be called a reservoir. A flowage, like a reservoir, can be any shape and size. Some, like the Minong Flowage and Gordon Flowage, were formed when dams flooded large, sprawling areas. Others, like the Colton Flowage in Washburn County, are smaller and have a simpler shoreline that resulted from the flooding of a long, narrow valley.

Nor is the term’s use universal; even around here, plenty of lakes upstream of dams are simply called “lakes.” Examples include Trego Lake, Hayward Lake, Nelson Lake, Moose Lake, and Lake Namekagon. And then there’s the Eau Claire Chain of Lakes that includes Lower Eau Claire Lake, Middle Eau Claire Lake, and Upper Eau Claire Lake. Each lies above a small dam. Although smaller lakes might have been there from the beginning, it’s the dams that give these lakes their present size and shape.

But why “flowage,” especially when it describes the one part of a river that’s no longer flowing? Webster’s defines flowage as a) an overflowing onto adjacent land, b) a body of water formed by overflowing or damming, c) floodwater especially of a stream. That first definition is key; it’s related to a whole body of real estate law surrounding the concept of “flowage easements,” which grant someone the right to flood land.

Flowage easements are most often granted to the state and federal government, but in the past they were often granted to utilities that built dams for generating electricity. Here in northern Wisconsin, flowage easements were also granted to logging companies so they could build dams for regulating water flow during the spring logging drives. They built dams, the water upstream of the dams rose, and then the water flowed onto the adjacent land. And that’s how we got the term “flowage.”

To learn more about any of the lakes and flowages mentioned in this post, go to the menu above and click on NW WI Lakes & Rivers. And for all your northwest Wisconsin real estate needs, whether you’re buying or selling, call Jean Hedren at (218) 590-6634. www.JeanHedren.com

Gordon Dam
Gordon Dam

Welcome to NW Wisconsin

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Cabin fever???

It’s been a cold winter here in NW Wisconsin. If you’re experiencing a little cabin fever, and if you’ve been thinking of looking for a place up north, maybe now’s the time. 

Sure, you could wait until May or June. But we have some good values on the market right now here in NW Wisconsin. By starting your search now, you’ll have time to find what you’re looking for, buy it, and close. You’ll be able to get moved, unpacked, and settled in time for some great fishing, boating, swimming, or any other summertime lake activity you most enjoy.

If you’ve got cabin fever, it’s time to start looking for a cabin or lake home here on any of the clear lakes here in Douglas, Washburn, Bayfield, or Sawyer County. If you want to know more about any of the wonderful lakes in NW Wisconsin, check out the Lakes and Rivers of NW Wisconsin tab above.

If you’re thinking of selling, why wait until May or June to put your home on the market? In NW Wisconsin, the real estate market usually gets going in spring. Buyers are already starting to look now. If you’d like to know what your property is worth in today’s market, call Jean Hedren, Edina Realty, NW Wisconsin. 218-590-6634.

Shoreland zoning protects your property values

If you’re shopping for waterfront property, you should know about shoreland zoning and the rules that go with it. No one likes rules. But the first thing you should know is that these rules don’t just benefit fish, birds, and wildlife, they benefit you

By preserving the up north qualities of our lakes and streams, these rules also preserve your property values. Even up here in NW Wisconsin, some lakes have a more urban feel. Other lakes, however, still have a relatively undeveloped feel – even though most of their shoreline is developed. Views are preserved, privacy is preserved, and so are property values.

Second, it’s important to know that certain minimum standards are in place in Wisconsin. In some counties, and even on certain lakes and streams, the rules are more strict. Existing homes, of course, are grandfathered in. But if you’re building on shoreland anywhere in Wisconsin, you’ll need to meet these minimum standards:

  • Lot size. Lots served by a public sanitary sewer must have a minimum average width of 65 feet and a minimum area of 10,000 square feet. “Unsewered” lots must have a minimum average width of 100 feet and minimum area of 20,000 square feet.
  • Buffer strip. Clear-cutting of trees and shrubs isn’t allowed in the strip of land from the ordinary high-water mark to 35′ inland. One exception is for a 30′ wide path, for every 100′ of shoreline, down to the water. That allows you to reach the water, have a great view from your living room, and still protect your privacy. (And also, by the way, preserve the view of whoever lives across the lake.)
  • Setbacks. All buildings and structures must be set back at least 75′ from the ordinary high-water mark. Exceptions include piers and boat-hoists. And, if an existing pattern of development exists, some counties may have a “setback averaging” system that allow homes to be built closer to the water. On certain bodies of water, though, setbacks are increased to 125′ – or, in rare cases, up to 300′.

This is just an overview; for details on these and other shoreland zoning provisions, contact the DNR or county officials. Keep in mind, too, that existing homes are grandfathered in. When you buy one, you obviously can’t do much to change the lot size or setback. You can, however, take steps to restore the buffer of natural vegetation along your home’s waterfront.

But don’t try shoreline restoration just because it’s good for the environment. Do it if you’d like to increase your privacy, see more birds and wildlife, and catch mroe fish. (And also, by the way, spend less time mowing your lawn.)

Buying or selling in NW Wisconsin? Call Jean Hedren, Edina Realty NW Wisconsin Realtor. 218-590-6634. Or visit www.JeanHedren.com.